You Should Know

Buckle up teens

Buckle up teens

Teen drivers have the highest accident rate and the lowest seat belt use rate of any other driving demographic. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the US. And research shows that seat belts reduce serious crash-related injuries and deaths by about half. Teens are especially bad at buckling up in the back seat. Whether your child is already driving, about to start driving or nowhere near driving, set a good example and buckle yourself and everyone else up every time you get in the car, no matter where the seat or how short the trip.

drink  away  anxiety

drink away anxiety

Feeling anxious? Drink some water. Dehydration can contribute to anxiety and nervousness. It has been linked to a rise in cortisol levels, the hormones that increase stress. And, it mimics some of the same bodily sensations that anxiety causes like headache, dizziness, increased heart rate and nausea. Studies have found that even mild dehydration can affect mood, energy levels and the ability to think clearly. Water really is essential to all of our organs, including our brain. And while it may not make all anxiety go away, it can certainly help minimize symptoms.

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OW!

OW!

Scientists have discovered that shouting “Ow!” when we’re physically hurt actually helps us cope with the pain. Apparently it disrupts the discomfort messages being sent to our brain and helps us tolerate the pain better. Previously, scientists thought the outbursts were an evolved method to communicate danger to others. Nope, we do it to distract ourselves. It’s instinctive and a simple sound that requires little articulatory control. So, it’s easy and effective to use when in pain. Perhaps we should investigate its use as a non-physical pain distraction too (like when we’re angry or frustrated).

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Break Time

Break Time

Research proves that taking a break from task-related stress allows you to come back more focused and productive than before. One study found that for every 52 minutes of work, highest performing employees took a 17 minute break. Considering the brain is like other muscles in the body and tires from repeated stress, it makes sense to give it a rest now and then. Think about that the next time your kid starts to melt down while doing homework or practicing the piano. And, you wouldn’t make your athlete workout without breaks!

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